Asian Elephant

GLOBAL DISTRIBUTION/RANGE: 
India, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Burma, Cambodia, China, Sumatra, Laos, Malaysia, Borneo, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Vietnam.

DIET: 
Wild-grasses, bark, leaves, roots, vines, shrubs, cultivated crops (such as bananas and sugar cane); in the zoo-hay, grain, fruit and vegetables.

HABITAT: 
Thick jungles to grassy plains.

DESCRIPTION: 
Height is 6-9 ft (1.8-2.7 m). The trunk is an elongated nose with the nostrils at the end. It serves as a "hand" to grasp objects and help the elephant feed or spray cleansing dirt or water over its body.

DID YOU KNOW? 
Females usually do not have tusks. Asian elephants are used as draft animals, for transportation and hunting purposes. Since 1978, these elephants have been classified as endangered due to them being killed for their ivory and habitat destruction. It is estimated that only 35-50,000 Asian elephants remain in the wild. Staff and volunteers at the El Paso Zoo are working to help protect elephant habitat in Sumatra. Visit the links on the right hand side of this page to get involved. There are over 15,000 captive elephants in Asia working in agricultural areas and as tourist attractions. The Asian elephant is the most common elephant species seen in the circus.

MORE ABOUT OUR ANIMALS: 
Savannah was born in the wild in 1952 and came to the El Paso Zoo in February of 1997. Juno was also born in the wild in 1967 and she came to the El Paso Zoo April of 2002.  She grew up in the circus.

HOW YOU CAN GET INVOLVED IN CONSERVATION EFFORTS:  
Read about elephants online and check out books from your local library. Become a member of the El Paso Zoological Society. Funds raised by the Society are used to support elephant conservation efforts at the Zoo and in the wild. Learn about the Palm Oil Crisis and how purchasing products with palm oil contributes to the loss of habitat for elephants. Also learn about how elephants are being killed when they go near palm oil plantations. 

JUST FOR KIDS:
Adopt an Elephant from the El Paso Zoological Society and learn to help save elephants and their habitat by downloading the Zoo's new Palm Oil Guide and Scanner App for smart phones and iOS applications.